Softness Personified with Jewelry

Here’s an example of styling perfection that brilliantly uses jewelry to focus attention on the soft womanliness of the wearer.

The model in the Neiman Marcus ad has big round eyes, a small nose and ears, lush lips, and fair coloring – blonde hair and hazel eyes. She wears a cream-colored sweater of textured yarn that invites touch. Her look is soft, warm and approachable.

Further emphasizing the softness of the look is the beautiful pearl jewelry she wears, from design house Yvel. Fresh water pearls of luminescent peach and golden hues encircle her neck and wrist and dangle from her ears. The pearls are reminiscent of her pillowy lips and round features. The colors suit her perfectly.

There are designers creating all manner of fabulous jewelry at all price points. Choose for your jewelry wardrobe jewelry designs that draw attention to and highlight your best features.

Styling Perfection: Nuances of Color

Every so often I come across a photograph of a fashion styling that stops me in my tracks. Savannah Guthrie, NBC-TV’s Today‘s new anchor, looks phenomenal in this photograph published in People magazine, wearing a dress by David Meister and earrings by Kimberly McDonald, styled by Stacey Kalchman.

The color of the dress is perfection with Guthrie’s eyes, bringing out their arresting color. The vee of the neckline of her dress is an ideal depth, coming to Guthrie’s first balance point. The subtle weave of the dress repeats the nuances of color seen in Guthrie’s hair, the warm yellow being a near-complementary color to the blue hues.

And the earrings — if you ever wonder why I encourage my clients to seek the perfect pair of earrings, here is a demonstration of why. The colors of the earrings pick up the hues from Guthrie’s eyes as well as those in her hair. The shape of the earrings subtly reflects the vee neckline of the dress. The center stone is an eye-catching natural beauty, full of mystery and nuance. The earrings sit on her ear lobes in an appropriately professional style, bringing attention up to Guthrie’s face. And the diamonds surrounding the center stone add a touch of dazzle, the perfect accessory for a rising star.

Watch for opportunities to attend jewelry trunk shows, where you can see the full line of designs and colors from a designer. Try on different designs and observe what styles are most flattering to you. If you’re not sure where to start, engage the services of a professional image consultant to help you determine your best colors and to point out the nuances of design in your own person. It is those nuances that make you individually and beautifully you.

TheOhLook: Photo Styling with a Diagonal Bent

This exquisite, uncredited photograph of Emily Blunt that appears with her profile in the March 2012 issue of InStyle magazine deserves a closer look.  Blunt is gorgeous, of course, and younger than most of my readers, but the styling of the actress and the photo are both worthy of mention.

The teal color of her dress relates to and heightens the color of her eyes and compliments both her skin tone and hair color, demonstrating the power of a flattering hue. Her jewelry, a bronze or antiqued gold cuff and an interesting arrangement of blue ringed agate stones and antiqued gold leaves, balance each other. Having only a glimpse of the jewelry to the right makes one want to see more of it, adding active intrigue to the photo.

The position of her right arm repeats the diagonal of her one-shoulder top. The effect is to draw the eye up to her face. A similar effect to this styling can be achieved with a drape of fabric, the careful positioning of one arm, and some well-chosen jewelry.

Also worthy of note is the quotation that appears at the bottom of her photo: “The most beautiful people are those who don’t realize they are. Those are the ones I stare at.” When asked to sum up her philosophy of beauty, Blunt replied: “I love seeing faces that live and breathe–that are covered with lots of lines and you want to know how they got them. People who do too much plastic surgery often have a very still, startled expression. I can’t imagine that there’s much joy to be gained from that. If you can’t move your face, you can’t express yourself.”