Among 101 Ways to Look and Feel Stylish This Season

Over the decade, writing innumerable pieces about image and style, I have found inspiration in many a “how to” list put together by the editors of various fashion-focused publications. There are nuggets of wisdom in most all of these compilations of tips.

1117 100 ways to look stylish People Mag Sept REV

For instance, the September 18, 2017 issue of People magazine suggests “100 Ways to Look & Feel Stylish This Fall.”

Some of the tips, like the opening item, “1. Accessorize like Selena Gomez” is a promotion of the actress’s 11-piece handbag collection with Coach. Many other specific handbags, shoes and items of makeup are included as items that each claim a number on the list.

Other tips are trend specific:  “5. Layer a slip dress over a turtleneck.” “12. Carry a daytime clutch.” “14. Sport some sassy socks.” These tips are likely to have a short shelf life, and should be considered in conjunction with this tip: “9. Pick and choose your trends.”

Other tips are evergreen bits of advice. For instance, “10. Make something old new again.” People quotes Jenn Rogien, costume designer for Orange Is the New Black:  “Every season I dig in the back of my closet and pull out something I haven’t worn in a while and wear it on repeat. It doesn’t cost anything, but it still makes you feel like you refreshed your wardrobe.”

That tip works well in conjunction with this one: “97. Take inventory.” The editors elaborate: “Do you own eight black shirts? Yet you still have your eye on another? Be honest with yourself. Write down everything you have and keep the list by your closet so you know what you definitely don’t need the next time you shop.”

Yet #97 conflicts somewhat with #98:  “98. Commit to your #OOTD.” Regarding the choice of one’s “outfit of the day,” People quotes Stacie Brockman, cofounder of a branding firm: “Instagram has made everyone terrified about re-wearing outfits for the sake of being sartorially outed, but there’s nothing chicer than a Steve Jobs-level uniform.”

I’ve written several time in this blog about the benefits of uniform dressing — finding one’s authentic personal style and sticking to it. Taking an inventory can be helpful in evaluating what might need to be replaced or refreshed. And if your personal uniform regularly includes black shirts, you should be on the lookout for new ones to replace any that are looking tired.

There is something wonderful about going through one’s closet and rediscovering items that haven’t been worn in a while. If these items make you look and feel great, let them have another day in the light. These are gifts you give yourself.

Let me add another tip: If there is something wonderful you have enjoyed wearing that is getting to the point of having seen better days, kind in mind that you may be able to replace it exactly, thanks to the worldwide market that is eBay. Brands and lines that have been discontinued may be alive in the form of vintage items currently available for sale, sometimes in brand new condition with the original tags. Vintage items are almost always going to cost far less than comparable new items.

You may also discover that your favorite designers or brands have additional items from previously released lines that you can be quite sure will prove to be flattering — a certain cut of jacket, style of pants, handbag, shoes, even a specific item of jewelry — because you already have like items in your wardrobe.

Think about any favorite item you wish you could replace, and take a look on eBay. You may be surprised and delighted with what you find.

There’s a High Price for That Low Price

I was going to write this month’s post on quite a different fashion-focused topic, when an article in the November 17, 2016 edition of the  Los Angeles Times caught my eye.

1116 LA Times garment makers 1 REV

This year, the U.S. Labor Department investigated 77 local Los Angeles garment companies that were supplying some of the biggest clothing stores in the nation, writes reporter Natalie Kitroeff, and found that many of these factories pay workers much less than the state minimum wage. “Investigators uncovered labor violations in 85% of the cases, the department said, and found that the companies cheated workers out of $1.1 million.” While even Nordstrom and Macy’s had ties to garment makers that did not pay minimum wage, “the retailers with ties to companies that had the most offenses were Ross Dress for Less, Forever 21 and TJ Maxx. Workers were paid as little as $4 an hour, and they got $7 an hour on average–$3 less than the state minimum wage. . . .”

Although the garment companies and some manufacturers that act as intermediaries between the factories and the retailers were ordered to pay $1.3 million in lost wages and damages to workers, the retailers “avoid any repercussions for hiring factories that violate labor laws. The Labor Department can only penalize companies that directly employ workers.” Keeping their distance from the factories by working with several layers of suppliers, the business model shields the retailers from liability.

Ruben Rosalez, a regional administrator with the Labor Department, said that the problem is “that retailers have not increased the rates they pay manufacturers in years. ‘The retailers are setting the prices. They’re saying, “Make this shirt for this amount,” but it’s the workers at the end of the chain that are getting screwed,’ Rosalez said.”

According to Rosalez, retailers “hire monitors to make sure their suppliers abroad are following the law but don’t do the same level of inspection in the U.S. . . . The stores ‘want to be able to meet demand on a quick basis. It’s cheaper to do it here as long as no one is looking,’ he said.”

Spokespersons for Ross Dress for Less and Forever 21 both responded to the reporter by email that they take these labor issues “very seriously” and are cooperating, as Ross puts it, “to make sure that suppliers understand the law.” Representatives of TJ Maxx did not return a request for comment. Kitroeff reports, “It is not clear whether the retailers are still doing business with clothes makers that underpay workers.”

Next time you consider buying that $18 jacket or $9 dress, consider how it’s possible for something new to be sold that cheaply. There’s a high price for that low price.

All is not lost. If you’re on a strict budget or enjoy scouting for bargains, shop online instead and head to eBay, where you can find all manner of brand new items with their original tags, purchases made that have never been used, from vendors all across the United States (yours truly included).

Judy Hornby silver pink dress 1

For instance, among the big trends of this season are 1980s styles, padded shoulders included, along with floral prints, ruffles and metallics. I have a vintage $1,215 Judy Hornby Couture pink and silver metallic silk dress with a ruffled hem, purchased at Marshall Field’s, brand new with tags, listed for under $200.

You can find the dress at http://www.ebay.com/itm/JUDY-HORNBY-COUTURE-1215-Pink-Silver-Foiled-Floral-Silk-Dress-80s-NWT-38-B-/171021327963?ssPageName=STRK:MESE:IT

I would love for the dress to be worn and enjoyed this holiday season.

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